Tag Archives: Knitting

Knitting Inspiration

Spring 2014 issue

Spring 2014 issue

When I saw the Spring 2014 issue of Interweave Knits, I just had to get it.  I used to subscribe but have cut down on my magazine subscriptions.  I decided that there would have to be several patterns I wanted to knit before I’d let myself buy a copy of any knit or crochet magazine.  I have  to admit that I have a library of back issues of various magazines!  But I wouldn’t dare toss them out.  I do refer to them occasionally.

This issue of Interweave Knits does not disappoint.  I’m thinking of going through it one pattern at a time and knitting them all!  It would be a big project, but I could blog about it and that would give me a boost to keep going.  Plus the patterns in this issue are so yummy!  I would also be working with yarns that I haven’t had experience with.  That’s part of the adventure.

Take a look at my Pinterest board to see my faves.  Have you seen this issue?  Which one should be my first project?  I’m thinking of a piece for spring or summer.  Maybe the Serendipity Tee by Jesie Ostermiller or the O’Kelly’s Chapel Shawl by Shirley Paden?

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Success! I Dropped A Stitch

That’s right!  I dropped a stitch and I’m happy about it. For those who don’t knit, dropping a stitch is usually not a good thing. It can be the reason for much frustration and hair pulling for beginning knitters, and can also cause them to rip out fabric that took them hours to create. Hey, I’ve done it.

But as you gain experience and confidence with your knitting skills, a dropped stitch is no longer a big deal.

I’ll show you how to fix a dropped stitch in a future post, but this time, I’m keeping that dropped stitch right where it is.

Shay Pendray, Laura Bryant, and Barry Klein on the set of Knitting Daily

Shay Pendray, Laura Bryant, and Barry Klein on the set of Knitting Daily

I recently caught an older episode of Knitting Daily where Laura Bryant of Prism Yarns and Barry Klein of Trendsetter Yarns (LOVE them!) show how to use dropped stitches to your advantage.

The scarf pattern is worked in garter stitch. It’s a great take-a-long project to work on while waiting at the doctor’s office or while your kids are at music lessons.

I chose a ball of TLC Cara Mia (Acrylic/Nylon/Rayon/Angora) that I’ve had for years. It finally told me what it wanted to be when it grew up!

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2 columns of dropped stitches so far

Don’t be nervous. But do be aware that you knit the entire scarf before dropping any stitches. See how the dropped stitch is dropped all the way down the length of the scarf?

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Bind Off edge showing the width of 3 stitches for 1 dropped stitch

Laura had a great tip that each dropped stitch will have the width of 3 stitches, so the bind off has some special tricks to it.

When looking at these photos, please keep in mind that my scarf isn’t quite finished. I have some more to bind off and stitches still left to drop. When it’s complete, there will be 4 columns of dropped stitches.  You can kind of see where the other 2 dropped-stitch columns will be on the photo above.  There are vertical indentions where the columns of new dropped stitches will be.

Get the pattern at Knitting Daily TV and drop some stitches on purpose!  And if you like the scarf that Laura shows at the beginning of the segment, that pattern is here.

I’d love to see your dropped stitch scarves. Dive into your stash and see what you come up with.

Knitting: A Lot More Than Just FUN! ;-)

I follow the Veggies, Yarns & Tails blog where I found this post and just had to blog about it.

It’s true! I definitely need knitting and crochet to help me with anxiety and stress. If I don’t get some crafting into my day, I can tell a difference in my mood.

I read an article last year that talked about the brain and how it’s unable to focus on worry or stress when you’re involved in repetitive motions, like with knitting or crochet. Your blood pressure decreases and your breathing has a regular pattern about it (which helps with anxiety).

For me, not only is the act of knitting and crocheting fun and satisfying, but I also enjoy making items for others. The benefit of having something tangible that someone can use, and making them happy too, releases dopamine. Everyone feels good!

Knit On!

VEGGIES, YARNS & TAILS

fruit slices socks for post 1

I came across a very interesting article today, at the Tree Hugger site re: the many benefits of knitting.

Not only is it great for stress relief which I did know about, it actually helps in a lot of other ways, to keep us healthy.

**Click to read the post here.**

So, the next time you are trying to justify another trip to your LYS or an online yarn splurge, remember it’s not just fun, it’s so good for your health too.

That’s certainly enough of a reason for me! 😉

Happy Crafting! 

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Up to the Challenge

Gerri Hat pattern designed by Marly Bird

Gerri Hat pattern designed by Marly Bird

Now that the holidays are over (hope yours were wonderful!) and I finished all of my gift knitting, I’m kicking it into high gear knitting hats for Halos of Hope.  Halos is a nonprofit that collects and distributes hand knitted and crocheted hats to cancer patients.

A few months ago, the KnottyGirls KnitCast decided to challenge other podcasters to see who could get their listeners to donate the most hats to Halos of Hope before Stitches West 2014.  Stitches events (there are several held around the country) are like conventions for knitters and crocheters.  I’ve never been to one, but some day… oh, yes, some day.

I listen to the Yarn Thing, Fiber Hooligan, and Knitmore Girls podcasts, all of whom are promoting the Podcaster Throwdown.  But Jasmine and Gigi, the Knitmore Girls, are the only ones of the three who are in the contest.  So, they’ll get my hats.

Marly Bird, of the Yarn Thing podcast, gave her listeners 2 free hat patterns on the condition that they would use them for Halos.  The Gerri is the one I’ve been knitting first.  So far, I have 8 completed and 1 almost off the needles.  Caron Simply Soft was on sale at Michaels, so I scored!  I bought more than I thought I could reasonably finish, but being one to jump in whole hog (oops!  let my GA roots come through there!), I told myself that it is possible.  I had the Gerri hat pattern memorized by the time the second hat flew off the needles, and I’ve been knitting every moment I can.  Each skein of Simply Soft gives me 2 Gerri hats with yarn left over.  I’m going to combine the left overs to create Marly’s Sous Chef hat.  It’s crocheted and I’m hoping it will go pretty fast.  Thanks Marly for the fantastic patterns!

9th hat almost finished!

9th hat almost finished!

I’m usually not one for New Year’s Resolutions, but this year I made a few.  My first New Year’s Resolution is happening!  I WILL have these hats shipped off before February 20th!

If you knit or crochet, please consider knitting soft, comfy hats for Halos of Hope.  Here are their guidelines.  It’s a great cause and you don’t have to make the February deadline.  They accept hats all year round.

I Toe That Sock Up

I enjoy knitting so much that I find myself working on some sort of knitting project almost every day.

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Here’s a tiny sample sock I knit from a class I took at Fibre Space.  Brenda Dayne, of the Cast-On podcast, was in town teaching her Sherman Toe Up Sock class.  I’ve listened to her podcast for a few years and couldn’t pass up the chance to meet her and learn a new technique!

It was great fun.  I prefer working my socks with dpns (double-pointed needles) and have taken to this method of working the toe and heel – it’s the same concept for both!  So, once you’ve got the toe down, the heel is no problem.

Several pairs of these socks (but much larger!) were made as presents last year.  I’ve taken a break from sock knitting, but have plenty of other crafty projects on my plate.